South Asia

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  • Samarpan Samajdar asked: What are the implications of ethnic sub-nationalism on bilateral relations in South Asia?

    Ashok K. Behuria replies: Most states in South Asia are multi-ethnic/cultural ones. The peculiar history of the region ensured large scale migration across different subregions of South Asia over time, resulting in ethnic, cultural and linguistic overlaps by default when the modern states were constituted as a byproduct of both colonial politics and anti-colonial struggles in the mid-twentieth century.

    The Geopolitics of Power Configuration in South Asia: Understanding Chinese Defence Minister’s Visit to Bangladesh and Sri Lanka

    Chinese Defence Minister Wei Fenghe’s visit to Bangladesh and Sri Lanka highlights Beijing’s deepening security engagement with South Asian countries.

    June 02, 2021

    Cooperative Security in South Asia: A Mirage?

    South Asia has a common history and celebrates its great cultural and linguistic overlap. However, the South Asian experience in building cooperative security architecture has been mixed. India on its part remains committed to strengthening cooperative security in the region.

    October 23, 2019

    Implications of the ISIS ‘province’ in Kashmir

    If Baghdadi has possibly moved toward the east, then the proclamation of an Indian branch flashes a note of caution for the security and intelligence agencies.

    May 17, 2019

    Moving Beyond the Listing of Masood Azhar

    With China now willing to discuss issues of mutual interest with India, a well-structured bilateral dialogue on regional and global terrorism may go a long way in convincing Beijing of the need to put pressure on Islamabad to act against terror

    May 16, 2019

    ISIS eyeing India in comeback plan

    The Sri Lanka Easter bombings has allowed ISIS chief Abu Bakr Al Baghdadi to launch a public relations offensive and enunciate a dangerous new strategy.

    May 06, 2019

    Himanshu Khulbe asked: Why India has become a major conduit for human and drug trafficking in South Asia?

    Pushpita Das replies: A combination of factors have made India a major conduit for human and drug trafficking in South Asia. As far as drug trafficking is concerned, being proximate to the ‘Golden Crescent’ (Afghanistan-Pakistan-Iran) and ‘Golden Triangle’ (Myanmar-Thailand-Laos) has made India vulnerable to the trafficking of narcotics and drugs such as heroin, hashish, including synthetic drugs produced in these areas.

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