Nuclear Disarmament

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  • Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons

    The Treaty on Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons has not succeeded in adding any additional universal stigma to nuclear weapons. It lacks the support base needed for replacing the Cold War vintage “Mutual Assured Destruction” with “Mutual Assured Abstinence”. The nuclear weapon countries’ faith in the deterrence logic remains intact.

    August 11, 2021

    NPT@50: How India Framed its Decision to Reject the Treaty

    India’s decision to reject the NPT was a display of astute statecraft with idealist posturing used to masquerade pursuit of national interests.

    September 25, 2020

    India’s ‘No First Use’ Nuclear Doctrine

    The Defence Minister’s recent statement on ‘no first use’ basically underlines the fact that India’s current nuclear doctrine is working well.

    September 16, 2019

    Prateek asked: Why did India ratify the Convention on Supplementary Compensation (CSC) which seems to go against certain clauses of the Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage Act (CLNDA)?

    G. Balachandran replies: No party to CSC has raised any objection to India’s accession on the ground that CLNDA is inconsistent with the provisions of CSC. The CSC too does not impose any obligation to which India may have an objection. Finally, in case of a nuclear incident in India, CSC may provide additional resources for compensation.

    Politics, Security and Nuclear Abolition: Beyond the Idealist Rhetoric

    Disarmament and non-proliferation are rightfully viewed as two sides of the same coin: the two imperatives that need to be met if the prospect of the complete elimination of nuclear weapons is to be realised. Although the existence of a link between the two concepts is obvious, the exact nature of this connection is perhaps not as clear. The central question here is whether it is politics or strategic realities that shape states’ nuclear options and by implication, the two-fold road to global zero.

    January 2014

    India’s Disarmament Myths and Political Realities*

    There is a need to debate both the necessity and desirability of nuclear disarmament without being burdened by India’s idealistic aspirations and unfounded assumptions about the heft that this premature superpower carries in international politics.

    October 10, 2012

    Power, Conservatism and India’s Nuclear Disarmament Policy

    Given the fact that there is a lot of noise being made to prod India into doing more on nuclear disarmament counter-intuitively suggests that India is actually doing very less on the issue. What explains India's reluctance?

    September 05, 2012

    To Stop Iran Getting the Bomb, Must We Learn to Live with Its Nuclear Capability?

    The latest report of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on Iran's alleged nuclear weapons programme, released on November 8, 2011, has effectively raised the global threat level. The agency faced the daunting challenge of making a judgement on how far Iran's nuclear programme has advanced and its potential for weaponisation on the basis of suggestive but dated, inconclusive and possibly fake evidence (hundreds of pages of evidence have been sourced to one laptop of unproven provenance given to the IAEA by a Western intelligence agency).

    March 2012

    Global Zero and Nuclear Disarmament Activism

    Though Global Zero’s ‘umbrella activism’ involving current and past policy practitioners and the general public alike can be expected to gain further momentum in the near future, its continued vitality may however be captive to the pressures of the timeline within which its vision is intended to be achieved.

    July 19, 2011

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