Terrorism

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  • Rohan Kusnur asked: What were the factors responsible for the show of restraint by India after major terrorist strikes like 2001 parliament attack and 26/11 Mumbai attacks?

    Ashok Kumar Behuria replies: As a responsible country in the comity of nations, India has rightly advocated restraint not only on these two occasions but also on several terrorist incidents across the country over the years. The factors driving this policy of restraint are: strategy of deniable subversion adopted by Pakistan, and nuclear balance which is in place since 1998.

    It is true that most of these terror attacks are traced to Pakistani territory. The groups orchestrating these attacks from Pakistani soil are reportedly acting at the behest of the intelligence agencies of Pakistan. Pakistan has traditionally used the militant/terror groups to pose perennial security challenges for India. Pakistani strategy involves the factor of deniability and therefore it has been difficult to pursue this issue successfully with Pakistan at the official level, despite the fact that we have a full-fledged discussion on the issue of terrorism in bilateral dialogues that we have had with Pakistan since the Lahore Agreement. Pakistan has quite adamantly refused to acknowledge any role in the terror attacks.

    The other factor constraining India's muscular response is the open nuclear deterrence that has come into play since 1998 between the two countries. While it has not discouraged Pakistan from using subversion (read terrorism) as a tool of their security policy vis-à-vis India, it has certainly prevented any possible Indian pre-emptive or punitive action as a response to terrorist attacks. Be that as it may, India did mobilise its army along the international border with Pakistan under Operation Parakram which did have a deterring effect on Pakistani behaviour, even if it is usually perceived as a cost-ineffective and an expensive counter-measure.
    The lesson from these experiences is that India will have to beef up its international security mechanism and plug the holes on a progressive basis, engage Pakistan on terrorism, and generate international pressure on Pakistan to behave responsibly.

    Militant Groups in South Asia

    Militant Groups in South Asia
    • Publisher: Pentagon Press
      2014

    This book is an attempt to profile important militant groups presently active in South Asian countries. The threat perception from each group has been covered in this book in details. The book will be useful for further research on militancy, terrorism, radicalisation and security related issues.

    • ISBN 978-81-8274-754-8,
    • Price: ₹. 995/-
    • E-copy available
    2014

    Nuclear Terrorism: The New Terror of the 21st Century

    Nuclear Terrorism: The New Terror of the 21st Century

    Nuclear terrorism is the most serious danger the world is facing today. Terrorist groups like Al Qaeda and Aum Shinrikyo have expressed their interest in acquiring a nuclear weapon. The only way to prevent this is to secure nuclear materials from falling into the wrong hands.

    2013

    Is It Time to Withdraw the Army from Kashmir?

    2013 witnessed the highest ceasefire violations in eight years, accompanied by a sharp increase in security force casualties. Some sections within the media and intelligentsia have misunderstood the army’s presence in disturbed areas as a reflection of its vested interests. It is time that the reality of its role and responsibility are better understood.

    December 13, 2013

    Coastal Security: Time for course correction

    Five years since the Mumbai terror attacks, the coastal mechanism remains weak. It is time to seriously consider the Indian coast guard as the single authority responsible for coastal security and accordingly amend the charter of the ICG.

    November 26, 2013

    Pak Army Continuing Proxy War in Kashmir

    Though the Pakistan army denies its involvement in raising violence levels along the LoC, the international boundary and in the hinterland, it is understood well that without the active support of the army and the ISI, no serious attempt can be made by the terrorists to infiltrate.

    October 23, 2013

    September 26 Attacks in J&K: Assessing the Response

    The infiltration by a large group of terrorists in the Karen Sector, is a harsh reminder for the police, army and security planners in the country that the ongoing proxy war from Pakistan will continue to challenge the Indian state.

    October 04, 2013

    Showdown between RIs and Pakistan Army: Implications for India

    The Pakistan army is caught in a cleft stick on the issue of dealing with the Radical Islamists. A section of the military establishment sympathizes and empathizes with the sectarian agenda of the RIs due to its own religious predilections.

    October 04, 2013

    India's Internal Security Situation: Present Realities and Future Pathways

    India's Internal Security Situation: Present Realities and Future Pathways

    The Monograph deals with the internal security situation in India. It focuses on the Naxal conflict, the Northeastern ethnic armed insurgencies, and terrorism for a detailed study.

    2013

    Arrest of Yasin Bhatkal: An Analysis

    The arrest of Bhatkal, head of the Indian Mujahideen, highlights the measures taken by security agencies including improved coordination in different states to apprehend a number of terrorists in the last few years.

    September 02, 2013

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