Energy Security

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  • The Quest for Nuclear Energy in West Asia: Energy Security or Strategic Necessity

    Most of the countries in West Asia have expressed an interest in developing nuclear energy. For them their growing demand of electricity owing to the increasing population, growing industries, their eternal reliance on the desalinated water and environmental protection are the major drivers of their decision to produce nuclear energy. Importantly, they would like to use nuclear energy for domestic consumption and supply oil and gas to earn more revenues.

    November 2010

    Geopolitics of Energy in West Asia: Competing Foreign Interests and Prospects for Regional Realignment

    The article analyses international politics surrounding the Iranian nuclear crisis, and its implications for stakeholders such as the United States and its western allies as well as for emerging market countries including India, China, and Turkey which are especially interested in Iran's energy resources. Given the existence of multiplicity of interests of these countries, often conflicting, the article analyses three possible scenarios of how the Iranian nuclear crisis is likely to be addressed.

    November 2010

    Is the Future of Energy Geopolitics in Space?

    Let's face the facts: we are not going to regulate our way out of either climate change, or a peaking of fossil fuels. Even if we could imagine that individuals and nations were capable of accepting significant reductions in their lifestyle for long-term self-interest or the interests of their grandchildren, no amount of increased efficiency of those already using energy is going to make up for the Other Three Billion (O3B) citizens of the world moving to developed lifestyles and their accompanying energy demand.

    November 2010

    The Politics of Nuclear Energy

    Nuclear energy, as we know it, was unleashed by nature at Oklo in Gabon, Africa, when uranium formed rings on its mountains billion of years ago. Natural uranium contains at least three per cent uranium. This uranium formed rings around the mountain and acted as fuel rods in a reactor. When rain water was run across the fuel rod, it acted as a reactor. The Oklo phenomenon was discovered only in 1972. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) saw fit to run an international conference on the subject.

    November 2010

    India's Energy Security: Challenges and Opportunities

    The eradication of poverty and prosperity depend upon the economic development of a nation which in turn is dependent on an adequate and continuous supply of energy sources. Hence, energy is the lifeline of economic development. The rise of South Asia in general and India in particular as a force on the economic scene is now widely acknowledged. India's growing population and expanding economy with the shift in focus from agriculture to the manufacturing and services sectors have led to an increase in energy intensity which has resulted in an unprecedented demand for energy sources.

    November 2010

    Turbulent Future Lies Ahead for Global Energy Markets

    What are the major trends that will shape the global energy future in the medium to long term, say up to 2030? The authoritative report of the International Energy Agency (IEA) issued in 2007, before the global economic slowdown of 2008–09, had predicted the world's primary energy demand growing by 55 per cent at an average annual rate of 1.8 per cent between 2005 and 2030. This was before the global economic crisis of 2008–09.

    November 2010

    Will CIL’s IPO lead to revolutionary transformation of the coal sector?

    The long awaited IPO of India’s largest coal producer, Coal India Limited, is finally ready to issue on Dalal Street next week. It is hoped that it will herald a significant transformation of the sector and usher in much needed restructuring and reform to make it more efficient and productive and ensure India’s long term energy security.

    October 28, 2010

    Arnab Dasgupta asked: What are the latest books on India's energy security (oil and natural gas)?

    G. C. K. Rai replies:
    Ligia Noronha and Anant Sudarshan, eds., India's Energy Security (Routledge, 2009).

    Bhupendra Kumar Singh, India's Energy Security: The Changing Dynamics (Pentagon Press, 2010).

    Lakshman Prasad, Energy Security for India: Some Perspectives (LAP Lambert Academic Publishing, 2009).

    Prashant Agrawal, China and India: A Comparative Analysis of Approaches to Energy Security (Vij Books, 2009).

    Shebonti Ray Dadwal, Rethinking Energy Security in India (Knowledge World International, 2008).

    Arnab Dasgupta asked: What I can read about India's energy security ventures in Latin America?

    Sreeradha Datta replies: Suggested readings for this would include the website of India's Ministry of External Affairs www.mea.gov.in. You can also look up the published reports of the Oil and Natural Gas Corporation, www.ongcindia.com and of ONGC Videsh Limited www.ongcvidesh.com. Not much has otherwise been written on this except for media reports which are all accessible on the internet.

    Why Coal Matters in India?

    Issues pertaining to coal mafias, coal unions and its politics ought to be addressed if any meaningful reforms or cuts in coal consumption are to be made.

    June 01, 2010

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