Biological Weapons

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  • Global Health Security for Collaborative Countering of Bio-threat Agents and Infectious Diseases

    In the post globalisation era, countries around the globe have teamed up to cooperate on various issues which include issues related to environment security to maritime security. However there have been very very few steps develop global health security. Most of the national support to this issue is limited only to contributing miniscule amount of money to WHO by developed and developing countries and handling it as a part counter-insurgency strategy. As a result, health security has been limited to a national issue.

    The Existing Biological Threat: Evaluating the Seventh Review Conference of the BTWC

    The Existing Biological Threat: Evaluating the Seventh Review Conference of the BTWC

    Bio terrorism is emerging more as possibility in the 21st century not only because of the changing nature of terrorism but also because of rapid growth in life sciences. These developments have been a concern for the BWC regime. In this backdrop the paper discusses the 7th Review Conference which was concluded in December 2011.

    Biological agents: Uncontrolled entry of exotic pathogens a major dent for Indian economy and security

    During and after World War II, various kinds of biological agents were weaponised. These included anthrax causing bacilli, vibrio cholera, and burkhalderia species against livestock, among others. All the countries that are signatory to the BWC have destroyed stockpiles of biological warfare agents. Small quantities of samples are still available with some of developed countries for the purpose of developing vaccines and detection technologies in case of future outbreaks.

    July-December 2011

    Biological Weapons Export Controls in India

    India’s growing biotechnology industry is a subject of discussions all over the world. There are several Indian companies and laboratories which have come up against heavy odds and are known as world class. In the coming years, the Indian biotech industry is going to become very active in the world market. Its top companies are allocating substantial resources in the Research & Development sector.

    July-December 2010

    NBC Weapons: How free is Africa of the scourge?

    The entry into force of the Africa’s Nuclear Weapon Free Zone Treaty or the Treaty of Pelindaba in July 2009 and the first conference of parties on November 4, 2010 is a big step towards making the African continent free of the scourge of nuclear weapons. The Treaty of Pelindaba seeks to ensure that nuclear weapons are not developed, produced, tested or otherwise acquired or stationed anywhere on the African continent or its associated islands. At the same time the treaty provides for the promotion of cooperation in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy on the African continent. Though Sub Saharan Africa is free of nuclear weapons programmes, many African countries have peaceful nuclear facilities and radioactive sources.

    July-December 2010

    European Union Policy on CBRN security: A Primer

    The European Commission (EC) adopted on June 24 a policy package on chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) security.

    July-September 2009

    Terror Forecast : RNBC Terrorism?

    Terror is not new to India. Modern man is living in a violent world and undeniably, societal threshold of violence is rising. As a result, ‘People’ are already inoculated against increasing dosage levels of violence. The need to spill more blood and launch more spectacular attacks to capture headlines is becoming a compulsion because of heightened security against traditional terrorist acts. Consequently, the post modern terrorist is technology-driven and is exploiting the openness of information and availability of cheap technology.

    April-June 2009

    The Emerging Biological Weapons Threat and Proliferation

    Biological weapons attack entails a pandemic and the health infrastructure and personnel could get overwhelmed by the demands on their services.

    January-March 2009

    Anthrax Case: The Mystery Remains

    In early August 2008 most of the US newspapers were highlighting the ‘suicide’ of the marked man suspected for his involvement in the spread of anthrax through letters in 2001. The FBI has stated that as the suspected scientist knew that he was likely to be indicted and charged with the spread of anthrax, he committed suicide. The chemical which was found in his blood during the post-mortem report was Tylenol, which caused his liver failure over several days.

    October-December 2008

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