Indian Ocean Region

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  • China’s Subsurface Presence in the Indian Ocean and India’s Options

    Enhanced naval capabilities, strategic partnerships, and comprehensive underwater domain awareness (UDA) will be key to coping with the challenges of Chinese subsurface presence in the Indian Ocean Region.

    July 11, 2024

    Maritime Security Architecture and Western Indian Ocean: India’s Stakes

    The Indian Navy can be expected to continue to use its significant deterrent and punitive capabilities to protect the sea lanes of communications in the Western Indian Ocean.

    January 18, 2024

    Monsoon and Climate Change Threat in the Indian Ocean Region

    Increased collaboration among countries of the Indian Ocean Region on atmospheric and ocean studies is essential to tackle the challenge of climate change-induced vulnerabilities.

    November 01, 2023

    Enriching the Defence Contours of India-Maldives Relations

    Raksha Mantri Rajnath Singh’s visit to Maldives has strengthened the countries’ long-standing ties and expanded defence cooperation.

    June 06, 2023

    Vineet Ravindran asked: What is India's role in the development of Agalega and Sabang? How does it fit into India's maritime strategy?

    Abhay Kumar Singh replies: As one of the most prominent resident naval powers in the Indian Ocean Region (IOR), India’s role has been critical to maintaining peace and security in the IOR. While strategic stability in the Indian Ocean matters for all nations, India has a vital stake in the evolution of a stable maritime order in the IOR. India has been conscious of its regional obligations and progressively has shown a willingness to become a ‘preferred security partner’ for the regional countries.

    Vineet Ravindran asked: How does the Trincomalee oil farm deal benefit India? Why is Trincomalee important for India?

    Gulbin Sultana replies: The Trincomalee Oil Tank Farm, also known as the China Bay Oil Tank Farm, was built by the British in the 1930s to supply fuel to Royal Navy ships during the Second World War. The British continued to control the oil farm comprising 99 tanks until the Sri Lankan Government took it over in 1957. Each of the existing 99 tanks can contain 12,000 tonnes of fuel.

    Vineet Ravindran asked: How does China benefit from Hambantota and similar Chinese-owned ports in other countries? Does the host country lose its sovereignty over the port?

    Abhay Kumar Singh replies: Decades of economic growth and government prioritisation have enabled China to position itself at the nexus of global maritime trade. Today, China is home to more shipping ports than any other country, including seven of the 10 busiest ports in the world. In addition, China owns over 100 ports in approximately 63 countries.

    Delegitimising China’s Naval Presence in the Indian Ocean Region

    The impending removal of the piracy High Risk Area off the coast of Somalia presents an ideal opportunity for India, in partnership with the wider Indo-Pacific maritime community, to delegitimise China’s naval presence and strengthen regional mechanisms for ensuring maritime security.

    August 30, 2022

    Russia’s New Maritime Doctrine

    Russia’s new maritime doctrine, the first policy document in Russia’s national security domain since the Ukraine conflict, reveals a bolder and more assertive Russia, and presents several opportunities for cooperation with India.

    August 17, 2022

    Prospects of Maritime Cooperation between India and Russia in Indian Ocean Region, Arctic and Russian Far East

    The India-Russia partnership is longstanding and time-tested, one of steadiest of the major relationships in the world. Although the relations between the two countries have remained exceptionally warm and cordial, their full potential has not been realised.

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